Above the Lines: A Complete Record of the Fighter Aces of by Norman L. R. Franks, Frank W. Bailey, Russell Guest

By Norman L. R. Franks, Frank W. Bailey, Russell Guest

Above the strains: an entire list of the Fighter Aces of the German Air provider, Naval Air provider and Flanders Marine Corps 1914-1918

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If approved by the Senate, he would most definitely take the position and serve with diligence, as was his responsibility, but his "great wish" was that he would not need to do so. Senator Conkling, who chaired the Commerce Committee in the Senate, viewed Theodore's nomination as a direct slap against him by President Hayes. He saw to it Theodore's great wish was granted. To Curtis's unhappiness, Theodore never ran for office himself. Perhaps he might have, if given time. Stomach cancer killed him in early 1878.

Now, with autumn coming on, the situation had improved, if only slightly. The push of German forces was stalled at the river Marne. Paris appeared safe for the moment. So far as Roosevelt was concerned, the whole extravaganza could not have been more terribly timed. If Roosevelt hated the Kaiser at the moment, it was less for what the German emperor was doing to Belgium and France than for what he was doing to Roosevelt's immediate political plans. What would happen to the autumn campaign? All bets were off.

Charging a "steal," Roosevelt stormed out of the convention, taking his supporters with him, and formed the Progressive Party (popularly known as the Bull Moose Party). As the Progressives' nominee for president, the irrepressible Roosevelt led a ragtag army of Republican defectors in a bruising, bare-knuckled campaign. He dashed back and forth across the country, attracting large crowds wherever he went. He gave dozens of speeches, including one delivered in Milwaukee immediately after being shot in the chest by a would-be assassin.

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